The Bald Eagle

The Bald Eagle

Wednesday, June 2, 2021

IWSG DAY, June 2, 2021, Timeframe to Finished Product and Its Shelf-life by Pat Garcia





 

Hello Everyone, 

 

It is IWSG Time!

 

IWSG is a writers' support group created and led by Alex Cavanaugh. 

 

Purpose: To share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all kinds!

 

This group is an immense help to many of us who do not mind sharing our insecurities, our successes, or giving encouragement and support to others. 

 

 

So, if you are interested and would like to join, the link below will lead you directly to us

 

https://www.insecurewriterssupportgroup.com/p/iwsg-sign-up.html

 

 

The awesome co-hosts for the June 2, 2021  posting of the IWSG are The awesome co-hosts for the June 2 posting of the IWSG are J Lenni Dorner, Sarah Foster,Natalie Aguirre, Lee Lowery, and Rachna Chhabria! 

 

 Submissions:  Entered Turn The Light On into the KCT International Literary "TREAT" Award Contest (Still Outstanding)

Contemplations Of A Woman Turning Sixty-Five - Flash Fiction, The Masters Review

A Portrait of Daisy Dee, Fiction, The Writer Short Story Contest


Results:  LAWD, LAWD into the WEP's April Challenge – made the shortlist

 

 


 

 

 Timeframe to Finished Product and Its Shelf-life

 

For me, it takes time, time, and then more time. When I write the first draft, I revise and revise until I see a chemical reaction taking place with the words that I choose to express myself. It's kind of like a light of insight that lets me know I'm almost there, but I haven't reached the zenith. That's when I put it on my shelf, and I start writing on something else. How long it stays, I cannot say. My first short story that came out this year, I started in 2015. It was only at the beginning of  2020 that I called it up from my computer and started restructuring it, and the result was my first published short story. 

 

I firmly believe that the timeframe is determined by your purpose for writing, what you hope to accomplish, and the raison d'etre behind your writing. 

 

One of my invisible writing mentors is John Gardner. It took him years to get The Sunlight Dialogues published. In fact, it was the first book he wrote but not the first book that was published.

 

Therefore, I don't worry about the timeframe because I will do as many revisions as needed and let it stay on the shelf as long as needed until I think my words speak life to me, and therefore, can speak life to the reader.


Have a lovely month of June.


Shalom aleichem









Pat Garcia

 

 

 

 

56 comments:

  1. In other words, you're taking your time and will know when it's ready.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Alex,
      Yes, that's exactly it. I don't let myself get wrapped up in due dates if I am the one publishing my own work.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  2. I agree with your "timing." There is an insight that pops up and you can feel when you are ready to finish.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi JQ,
      That is so true. It's an insight that whispers it's finished.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  3. I so agree with you that some of the time you wait depends on your purpose and what your manuscript needs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Natalie. There are so many things that a writer must know. One of them is the reason why he or she writes.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  4. I think it's good not to stress about timelines. Focusing on the purpose of your writing is the way to go.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Toi and I agree wholeheartedly with you.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  5. I don't think I'd like to be put into a time frame either. That's a lot of pressure to deal with.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Joylene,
      Yes that is a lot of pressure and it is not always healthy pressure. Thank you for coming by.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  6. "...revise until I see a chemical reaction taking place..." That is an interesting process and makes perfect sense. I may experience an inner sense of satisfaction, but similar message from brain to heart.
    Thank you for sharing what works for you.
    Lynn La Vita @ http://la-vita.us/write/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Lynn. Yes! From brain to heart. You've said it all.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  7. Love it!
    My subconscious tends to work on things while they're sitting on the shelf and that helps tremendously!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Jemi. I like that you subconsciously work o things that are sitting on the shelf. I do too.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  8. Wonderful way to look at it!
    Every time I start to get impatient with a project, I usually shelve it and work on something else.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you JEN! I do the same thing. Ir is not uncommon for me to be working on two things at a time.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  9. Hi Pat, I too like to revise a lot: plot revisions, character revisions, sentence and grammar revisions. While the draft is sitting pretty on the shelf, my subconscious works overtime to polish and teak the story. Stay safe.

    Rachna Chhabria
    Co-host IWSG
    Rachna's Scriptorium

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Rachna,
      That sounds good. Words of wisdom in what you have said. Thank you for coming by.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  10. It took me 8.5 years, over three major writing periods, to finish the first draft of my first Russian historical, and then about 3.5 years to edit and revise it a decade later. Each story takes as long as it needs to be completed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Carrie-Anne,
      Right On! I like your reasoning.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  11. Time is the biggest factor, isn't it? Glad you're patient and careful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Lee,
      Yes, time is the biggest factor. Of course, when you're a published author that will change because it depends upon the publisher.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  12. Such a great way to look at the writing life! The only time I've worried about timelines is if I have an actual deadline. My fiction moves along at its own sweet pace and I'm good with that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Right On! Lee. That is the main thing. Finding what you're comfortable with.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  13. Yes, I guess it is that mysterious inner clock that tells us when a story is ready for a revision. Maybe when it is finally forgotten, so I could see it with fresh eyes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Olga. It is so important to see the story with fresh eyes.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  14. Well that makes so much sense Pat. I'm more desperate in that sense. Can't rest until I'm done.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Sonia. If that works for you, that is all that counts.
      Take care.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  15. I like your attitude. So much like mine. hehehe

    Have a great June.

    Anna from elements of emaginette

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Anna. I am smiling at your comment.
      Take care.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  16. Good advice. My first novel was not my first to publish either. They get published when they are polished, and not before. Thanks for visiting my blog.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Melissa. I so agree with you. They get published when they are polished.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  17. I agree that there is no time frame. It must feel right no matter how long it takes!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Jennifer. We have to feel right when we put something out there for others to read.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  18. I like what you said about writing until it sort of feels right. That's what I tend to do now too. It's taken a lot of work to get to the place where I can just tell if a scene is off, because when I first started writing, I couldn't often see my own mistakes.
    Great advice!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Jenni. I believe we all go through that process. It takes years to really perfect what we know and learned that which we don't know.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  19. I like that. I agree great advice. Instinctively doing what feels right for you. I love whatever will be or rather whenever will be thought process. Happy IWSG, Happy Writing and Blessing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Juneta. Have a great month of June.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  20. Your post reinforces the value that writing brings to the writer. From drafting to revision to that 'light of insight' that says this piece is done -- for now. Yes. And thank you for visiting me!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Beth. I truly enjoy visiting your blog. In fact, I look forward to it.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  21. I agree, it always depends on what the particular story needs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Sarah. That's why we writers have to be opened to what we're writing. I always say that I need to find the right tune.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  22. Used to be in such a hurry to write, finish and rewrite a manuscript that I used to feel guilty and awful when I didn't. Took me awhile to learn that it's alright if I leave a WIP on the shelf for years. The first book I published was a poetry chapbook. But the first book I wrote is a cross somewhere between medieval fantasy and sword and sorcery.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Lidy. I believe it takes us all a while to learn that.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  23. "I firmly believe that the timeframe is determined by your purpose for writing, what you hope to accomplish, and the raison d'etre behind your writing. " I totally agree.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Lynda. I can only say, AMEN that.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  24. I like what you said about chemical reactions and insights. Truly lovely. And good luck on those submissions!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Shannon. Believe it or not, I feel good with submitting my work. It is the only way I can learn, and I got that from visiting your blog posts on IWSG Day.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  25. I definitely have let some stories and books sit for a very long time, waiting for my brain to process them (or in at least one case, having given up on the book, only to return years later and make it work). I like your attitude about it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Rebecca. It is good when let our brain and heart process what we have written. I think all writers do that in some form or another.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  26. Great words for all of us to build on.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Ann. I am humbled at your reception of what I wrote.
      Take care.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  27. You sound like me, Pat. It takes as long as it takes. I started my vampires as a serial in 2015 and after a scathing critique from an editor, I got the series started. So, whatever...and whenever...I wish you a great month! And hope to see you at the Great Wave!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Denise. I love the book that I beta read for the vampire series. I do plan on entering the Great Wave. I just have to put together what I want to say cause it's pretty complicated.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete
  28. I love your way of expressing it - a "chemical reaction" captures the process quite perfectly.
    Have a great month, Pat.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much, Michelle. I wish you too a great June month.
      Shalom aleichem

      Delete

Your comment is waiting approval. Thank you for dropping by. Shalom, Pat Garcia