The Bald Eagle

The Bald Eagle

Wednesday, August 5, 2020

IWSG DAY, August 5, 2020, Which Way To Go by Pat Garcia









Hello Everyone,

 

 

It is IWSG Time!

 

IWSG is a writers' support group created and led by Alex Cavanaugh. 

 

Purpose: To share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all kinds!

 

This group is an immense help to many of us who do not mind sharing our insecurities, our successes, or giving encouragement and support to others. 

 

 

So, if you are interested and would like to join, the link below will lead you directly to us:

 

The Insecure Writer's Support Group 

 

The awesome co-hosts for the August 5 posting of the IWSG are Susan Baury Rouchard, Nancy Gideon, Jennifer Lane, Jennifer Hawes, Chemist Ken, and Chrys Fey! 

 

 

Submission: The Writer Magazine – Non-Fiction Challenge (Results Still Outstanding)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Which Way To Go?

 

I like to know the direction when I begin to write. Whether it is Non-Fiction or Fiction, I need parameters. That doesn't mean that I box myself in and don't jump over those parameters.  It means that there are specific guidelines that I follow because I am not just writing for myself. 

 

Having parameters also mean that I know what I am good at. There are some genres that I don't write in. I do take some elements out of these genres and mixed them in my writing, but I don't think you will ever read a horror story by me.  Although I know some great horror writers, I personally would never be able to sleep again if I tried to write one.

 

Thus, my stories are created because I know the genre, I want to write in. 

 

I wish you all a lovely month of August. 

 

Shalom aleichem,













Pat Garcia 

18 comments:

  1. That's great you know what genres you like. Me too, though I may branch out and write a mystery one of these days.

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  2. Exactly. I know my strengths and work with them not against them.

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  3. I like having parameters, or a box, to work within while at the same time knowing if the story needs more elbow room, I can - and will! - let it out. :)

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  4. Perfect! Knowing your own strengths is so important.
    I often have ideas for more intense/scary fiction, but I'm not brave enough to live in that world long enough to write it!

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  5. Knowing what you like to write, what works for you is half the battle. I don't blame you about horror. I feel the same way. Nightmares. LOL

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  6. I need to tell that I've tried several times to subscribe to your blog unsuccessfully. I don't if the problem is at my end or yours, but I'll keep trying.

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    1. Pat! I got it working! Your post was in my inbox this morning.

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  7. I hear what you're saying about knowing what you're good at. There are just some things I couldn't begin to write.

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  8. Thanks for stopping by my blog and your kind words.
    Blessings for your latests submission. I think it's good to know your genre and work with your known strengths.
    Happy IWSG Day!

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  9. I have my fingers crossed that The Writer Magazine will accept your article.
    I've never written for submission. Maybe, someday. Right now, it's a challenge to write my stuff & manage an online writer's group.
    Cheers.

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  10. Sounds like you set-up a framework. I work within one as well. It keeps me going in the right direction and leaves me room to be creative.

    Nice to be back. :-)

    Anna from elements of emaginette

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  11. I do the same thing. I take elements from other genres and mix it into my stories, but those genres (like horror) I wouldn't be able to write in.

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  12. Knowing your strengths and weaknesses is always a good idea.

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  13. I'm with you - I couldn't write full-on horror. I'm way too much of a scaredy cat.

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  14. I don't so much take elements from other genres as take events from other genres and transform them into mine - speculative fiction. It's fascinating to watch (and imagine) how a story changes, when the same occurrences are treated with magic instead of forensic science, for example.

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  15. Knowing your genre is half the battle!

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  16. I like parameters too. They help me focus and ultimately encourage my creativity. But everyone has to learn what works for them individually.

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  17. It's always wonderful to be sure if what you're doing and have a direction. I'm mostly lost on what course my writing takes until I finally put it on paper...Like in black and white.
    Keep safe Pat. Best wishes to you!

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